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Overview Of Car Parts In An Emissions System

Posted by on Jun 4, 2018 in Car Tips |

Overview Of Car Parts In An Emissions System

The emissions system is one of the areas that most drivers happily ignore. They might diligently have the oil in their cars changed every 5,000 miles. And they may replace the filters religiously. But, when it comes to the parts and components that comprise their emissions system, many people close their eyes and hope for the best. The problem is that there are a lot of parts that contribute to that area and things can go wrong with each of them. When they malfunction, which can happen as your vehicle ages, the fuel-efficiency and performance of your car can suffer dramatically.

Today, I’ll provide you with a quick overview of the components that make up your vehicle’s emissions system. I’ll also explain the tasks for which they’re responsible, and what can happen to them over time.

Catalytic Converter

The catalytic converter is supposed to help eliminate hydrocarbons that are in the exhaust. There are several chemicals within the part that allow it to perform this function. However, those chemicals don’t last forever; they diminish with constant use. When they’re exhausted (no pun intended), your vehicle can fail an emissions test. Just remember, a catalytic converter may look fine, but the chemicals within can be depleted.

The Muffler

Very few people ever think about their car’s muffler and when they do, it’s normally in the context of how their engine sounds without it. In truth, the muffler plays an important role in managing the pressure that results from your engine’s combustion process. Plus, it also helps the catalytic converter regulate the temperature at which it burns hydrocarbons.

Oxygen Sensor

Your engine requires both gas and oxygen during combustion. Its operational efficiency depends largely on the mixture of both elements. When there’s too much oxygen present, the exhaust will contain too many hydrocarbons, causing the catalytic converter to work harder. Your car’s oxygen sensor helps to regulate the mixture of gas and air used during combustion. However, they can wear out quickly, so plan to change the sensor every 4 or 5 years (of course, double-check your owner’s manual).

PCV Valve

PCV values are relatively cheap and they perform a simple function, but they’re critical to your car’s emissions. The crankcase has a tendency to accumulate gases. The valve’s job is to redirect those gases over to the intake manifold. If that doesn’t happen, the fumes contained inside the crankcase can “dirty” your vehicle’s exhaust. PCV valves can get blocked or clogged over the years, so you’ll need to replace it periodically. But, it’s a simple job and doesn’t take much time.

A Team Of Car Parts

The components that I’ve mentioned above work as a team in order to clean up your vehicle’s emissions. That means if one component malfunctions, the effectiveness of the others can be impacted. Have them checked the next time you visit your mechanic. By keeping the entire system in good shape, you’ll enjoy better fuel-efficiency and performance.

4 Smart Tips For Making Your Vehicle Last

Posted by on May 29, 2018 in Race Cars |

4 Smart Tips For Making Your Vehicle Last

Because the prices of new cars has climbed steeply over the last decade, people are more willing to keep their older models. As long as they can keep running without requiring major repairs (for example, a transmission overhaul), it’s far easier on the budget. And therein lies the challenge.

Your vehicle will eventually die and need to be retired. There’s little you can do to prevent that from happening aside from pouring money into an ongoing string of expensive repairs. However, there are some smart things you can do that will prolong your car’s life. The following four items are simple and intuitive, yet millions of drivers fail to do them:

#1 – Follow Your Owner’s Manual Closely

Strangely, many people have never looked at their owner’s manual, even though it holds the secret to your car’s life. It contains a service schedule (this might be a separate booklet) that details every important maintenance item. It explains exactly when those items should be performed. From oil changes to air filter checks, and spark plug replacements to your ignition system, everything is listed in your service schedule. The key is to use it.

#2 – Be Gentle When You Start It

When your car sits for hours, the oil that circulates throughout the engine falls to the oil pan. Without that oil, your engine would overheat. When you start your vehicle, the engine roars to life, but it takes several seconds for the oil to move from the pan to the moving parts. Have you ever watched someone start their car and immediately floor it? That’s a good way to damage the engine. Be gentle. Crank the engine and let it idle for twenty or thirty seconds before throwing it into gear. You won’t notice the benefits, but over time, it will make a difference.

#3 – Check The Fluid Levels

Your oil, coolant, power steering, and transmission fluid levels can decline over time. It is critical that you keep all of them replenished. Most drivers neglect to check their levels because it’s inconvenient to do so. Get into the biweekly habit of checking all four fluids at once. It only takes 15 minutes and will help you avoid expensive repairs down the road.

#4 – Drive Easily

If you own a performance vehicle, you’re probably going to treat the engine harshly. Chances are, you spent a good sum of money and you want to enjoy the benefits. Fair enough. On the other hand, if you own a Toyota Camry, Dodge Charger, or a Honda Civic, you’re likely budget-conscious. So, drive gently. There’s rarely a need to drop the clutch and peel your wheels at 6,000 rpms. Besides, constantly doing so will land your vehicle in the repair shop far sooner than otherwise.

Your car won’t last forever. But, if you address key maintenance items, regularly check the fluids, and treat it gently (at start-up and while driving), you’ll prolong its life. And avoiding expensive repairs is nearly as good as money in the bank.

b1163

Posted by on May 21, 2018 in Cars |

Here is a Nissan Sunny (B11)

image from: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Nissan_Sunny_(B11)_01.jpg

I mean it ant the fastest car in the world but it might be a fun fixer upper to zip around for a kids starter car.

what would you do to it? how would you fix it up? add-ons and cool features you would do if it was yours or your kids?

leave your comments below please.

have you ever owned this same car?

a19794

Posted by on May 21, 2018 in Cars, Race Cars |

What about a 1979 for a race car… a BMW!

Check out this sweet ride:

Image from: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:BMW_M1_(1979)_p2.JPG

 

do you like the color of this car?

My daughter says this car is unique and economical and the tires don’t have enough silver, that’s the bad part about it. She does not like the BMW emblem.

She says the tires are to much black, she would like it if they were fuchsia pink. 🙂

This car she would love to decorate with stickers on the outside but just not the windows and she would love this car to sparkle.

She would also want this car to have the shape the taller so that when she gets in the car into her car seat she wouldn’t hit her head on the top every time.

She would like the review side mirrors to be the color of green.

She says the color of this car is not in unique and she would like this car to be the color of violet.

by the way she is 5 years old in a few weeks. lol

a19732

Posted by on May 21, 2018 in Race Cars |

Check out this 1973 Charger

Image from: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:1973_Charger_side.jpg

pretty sweet! 🙂

would love to race this car…

and find one and restore it to new again.

whats your favorite 1973 car?

 

 

What To Do When You’re Involved In A Fender Bender

Posted by on May 20, 2018 in Car Tips |

What To Do When You’re Involved In A Fender Bender

Being involved in a traffic collision can be extremely unnerving. It may be difficult to think clearly as you try to collect your thoughts and check whether you’re injured. It’s important that you know what steps to take in order to make sure the event is documented properly and you can follow up with the other driver. If you have never been involved in a fender bender, use the following tips as a blueprint to guide you through the experience.

Keep Your Thoughts To Yourself

A lot of motorists are tempted to absorb responsibility for the car accident, even if fault lies with the other driver. It’s fine to ask the other person if they’re injured, but avoid discussing the accident until the police arrive. That will give you time to clear your thoughts so you can provide an accurate account.

Take Pictures And Notes

Photograph both vehicles. Ideally, the photos should clearly show any damaged parts on your car and the positions of the vehicles in relation to the road. That will provide context. When you contact your insurance company, the photographs will help validate your claims.

Also, write down any notes that seem relevant; you may be unable to recall certain details later. If anybody who is not involved with the accident witnessed it, collect their contact information.

File A Traffic Accident Report

It’s helpful to complete a police report, even if you and the other driver are uninjured. Not only does the report document the event, but it can often help accelerate the response from your insurance company.

Get The Other Driver’s Information

Getting the contact information of the other motorist is essential if you intend to follow up later. Ask for the person’s name, phone number, address, and insurance policy number. You’ll also want to have their driver’s license number. Finally, if the other person doesn’t own the car, ask how they are related to the owner and ask for the owner’s contact information.

Review Your Auto Insurance Policy

You should have a basic understanding about what your auto insurance policy covers before you’re involved in a collision. Take the time to review your policy. Does it cover a rental car and tow truck? Does it cover your car in the event the other driver is uninsured? At the very least, know where your policy is so you can quickly contact your insurance company to start the claims process.

One last note about getting into fender benders: if the damage is minor, it’s tempting to settle the matter privately rather than contacting your auto insurance provider. That can leave you vulnerable. The other motorist might change his mind and contact his provider, making up details that are inaccurate. If your carrier is unable to determine what truly happened, you may become exposed to a lawsuit. Play it safe and report the incident to your auto insurance provider. The extra time you spend is a good investment for peace of mind.