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Does Your Street Race Car Have Tinted Windows?

Posted by on Mar 22, 2018 in Cars, Race, Tinted Windows |

Hey there,

Happy you stopped by this post… I wanted to write a post about your street Race Car having Tinted Windows or not and if not, why?

As Race Car lovers, we put so much money into our rides, from rims, tires, paint, graphics, and all sorts of engine enhancements plus all kinds of interior upgrades and add-ons…

One of the most valuable things you can invest in your race car is window tinting. There are many benefits, most commonly is changing the looks with Tinted Windows. But you also get UV protection from the sun’s harmful rays. You can also protect the interior from cracking and fading from the sun damage… most high quality films protect from skin cancer and is backed my the Skin Cancer Foundation.

With Tinted Windows you can go with dark tints for more of a privacy look also known sometimes as a ghetto look but can also serve a purpose if you need privacy to hide tools or something like that in the back of a truck or van… As you know we are more taking about race cars here and not trucks or van, so some of us do like there windows blacked out pretty dark getting the Gangster look.

You can also go with a really light shade if you want to be seen easier in your ride, this is more for the benefits of UV Protection and or Heat Rejection from some of the higher end films out there.

You can also go with something in-between, the medium shades keep your race car looking more classy looking, more of my personal favorites. People can obviously tell your windows are tinted but its not supper dark either.

All Tints are not created equal… there are many different brands of automotive window film out there and within each brand there are multiple different lines of films. Each have there different qualities and benefits that should be considered before getting your windows tinted.  So do your research before investing in window tinting for your ride… Trust me it’s not worth it to go cheap in the short run just to save money because it will cost you double or triple in the long run if you go with cheap tint. I have seen it first hand.

Enjoy this video I found on YouTube

and feel free to leave a comment and tell me what you think…

Do you have your car tinted?

How light or dark did you go?

What brand of film did you go with?

What line within that brand did you get?

leave a pic of your car if you can.

 

Thanks and all the best,

Check you on the next post.

Why are used car prices plummeting rapidly? How to avoid the pitfalls of buying used.

Posted by on Jun 17, 2018 in Cars |

Why do new cars cost more every year yet their used counterparts are decreasing in value? According to a detailed study conducted by Used Cars Exposed, a five year old used car is worth considerably less now than five years ago for the same age car. In other words, the average new car in Australia in 2000 depreciated by 30% after three years compared with 21% in 1995. At this rate, a 2003 model will lose 36% of its value after three years.
Alarmingly, used car values in the United States have dropped by the same amount although used cars in this country depreciate quicker than in Australia.
The average car in the united Kingdom now loses a staggering 68% of its new purchase price after three years compared with 62% from 1993.
The big question on everyone’s lips right now is: ‘how much will my new car be worth in five years?’ More to the point, how much can the average person afford to lose? As times are slowly getting tougher and inflation is on the rise, many families and average wage earners are turning to used cars. Whether it is the average family buying a second run-about or the student looking for his/her first car, used cars are going to be with us long into the future.
But before you go out and buy the first used car that you see, or even the one that your grandfather’s friend is selling, there are dangers to look out for.
I, James Alphonse, was recently in the market for a used car but did not have a clue what to buy. People with well meaning advice scared me with comments like: ‘what if the car is unreliable?’ or ‘do you know what problems to look for?’ and ‘do you understand how each car operates and handles?’
No, I had no idea. Foolishly I bought an old Gemini from a friend for more than it was really worth and it proved to be the most unreliable bomb I ever owned. Over a period of three years I ended up spending nearly $4,000 just to keep it in working order. What a waste of money!
It was only then that I decided to look for some sort of information book that would give detailed information about every used car such as the average used price per year, reliability and recall report, test drive, what problems to look out for, fuel economy, overall practicality and model history. nothing of its kind existed – up until now. An acquaintance, Mr. A. Milkins has recently started a new web site that provides this very information plus more. Derived from technical service bulletins and extensive research since 2001, Used Cars Exposed was released in late 2003. Speaking to mr. Milkins, this is what he told me:
“Basically, Used Cars Exposed endeavours to provide the average person with all the vital information they need when considering purchasing a used car. For a modest AU$35 price tag, buyers in this market have all the resources for nearly every make and model dating from 1970 to the present day. It takes virtually all the worry and risk out of finding the right car. Armed with this valuable data, one can boldly select a used car and rest assured knowing they may have saved themselves from losing thousands in repairs,”
Does Used Cars Exposed serve only Australia?
“No, special editions are available for the American and British markets as well as Australia. A South African version will also be on offer soon,”
Do you think this is good value for money?
“AU$35 is only US$18 and 14 pounds in England. Considering that the Used Cars Exposed CD-book contains around 200 of pages of valuable information that can save you a small fortune, of coarse it is good value,” Mr. Milkins said.
The advice in the CD was definitely worth its weight in gold as I have been able to avoid a few pitfalls and am now driving a decent used vehicle.
Check out http : // usedcarsexposed . com and save a fortune.

Overview Of Car Parts In An Emissions System

Posted by on Jun 4, 2018 in Car Tips |

Overview Of Car Parts In An Emissions System

The emissions system is one of the areas that most drivers happily ignore. They might diligently have the oil in their cars changed every 5,000 miles. And they may replace the filters religiously. But, when it comes to the parts and components that comprise their emissions system, many people close their eyes and hope for the best. The problem is that there are a lot of parts that contribute to that area and things can go wrong with each of them. When they malfunction, which can happen as your vehicle ages, the fuel-efficiency and performance of your car can suffer dramatically.

Today, I’ll provide you with a quick overview of the components that make up your vehicle’s emissions system. I’ll also explain the tasks for which they’re responsible, and what can happen to them over time.

Catalytic Converter

The catalytic converter is supposed to help eliminate hydrocarbons that are in the exhaust. There are several chemicals within the part that allow it to perform this function. However, those chemicals don’t last forever; they diminish with constant use. When they’re exhausted (no pun intended), your vehicle can fail an emissions test. Just remember, a catalytic converter may look fine, but the chemicals within can be depleted.

The Muffler

Very few people ever think about their car’s muffler and when they do, it’s normally in the context of how their engine sounds without it. In truth, the muffler plays an important role in managing the pressure that results from your engine’s combustion process. Plus, it also helps the catalytic converter regulate the temperature at which it burns hydrocarbons.

Oxygen Sensor

Your engine requires both gas and oxygen during combustion. Its operational efficiency depends largely on the mixture of both elements. When there’s too much oxygen present, the exhaust will contain too many hydrocarbons, causing the catalytic converter to work harder. Your car’s oxygen sensor helps to regulate the mixture of gas and air used during combustion. However, they can wear out quickly, so plan to change the sensor every 4 or 5 years (of course, double-check your owner’s manual).

PCV Valve

PCV values are relatively cheap and they perform a simple function, but they’re critical to your car’s emissions. The crankcase has a tendency to accumulate gases. The valve’s job is to redirect those gases over to the intake manifold. If that doesn’t happen, the fumes contained inside the crankcase can “dirty” your vehicle’s exhaust. PCV valves can get blocked or clogged over the years, so you’ll need to replace it periodically. But, it’s a simple job and doesn’t take much time.

A Team Of Car Parts

The components that I’ve mentioned above work as a team in order to clean up your vehicle’s emissions. That means if one component malfunctions, the effectiveness of the others can be impacted. Have them checked the next time you visit your mechanic. By keeping the entire system in good shape, you’ll enjoy better fuel-efficiency and performance.

4 Smart Tips For Making Your Vehicle Last

Posted by on May 29, 2018 in Race Cars |

4 Smart Tips For Making Your Vehicle Last

Because the prices of new cars has climbed steeply over the last decade, people are more willing to keep their older models. As long as they can keep running without requiring major repairs (for example, a transmission overhaul), it’s far easier on the budget. And therein lies the challenge.

Your vehicle will eventually die and need to be retired. There’s little you can do to prevent that from happening aside from pouring money into an ongoing string of expensive repairs. However, there are some smart things you can do that will prolong your car’s life. The following four items are simple and intuitive, yet millions of drivers fail to do them:

#1 – Follow Your Owner’s Manual Closely

Strangely, many people have never looked at their owner’s manual, even though it holds the secret to your car’s life. It contains a service schedule (this might be a separate booklet) that details every important maintenance item. It explains exactly when those items should be performed. From oil changes to air filter checks, and spark plug replacements to your ignition system, everything is listed in your service schedule. The key is to use it.

#2 – Be Gentle When You Start It

When your car sits for hours, the oil that circulates throughout the engine falls to the oil pan. Without that oil, your engine would overheat. When you start your vehicle, the engine roars to life, but it takes several seconds for the oil to move from the pan to the moving parts. Have you ever watched someone start their car and immediately floor it? That’s a good way to damage the engine. Be gentle. Crank the engine and let it idle for twenty or thirty seconds before throwing it into gear. You won’t notice the benefits, but over time, it will make a difference.

#3 – Check The Fluid Levels

Your oil, coolant, power steering, and transmission fluid levels can decline over time. It is critical that you keep all of them replenished. Most drivers neglect to check their levels because it’s inconvenient to do so. Get into the biweekly habit of checking all four fluids at once. It only takes 15 minutes and will help you avoid expensive repairs down the road.

#4 – Drive Easily

If you own a performance vehicle, you’re probably going to treat the engine harshly. Chances are, you spent a good sum of money and you want to enjoy the benefits. Fair enough. On the other hand, if you own a Toyota Camry, Dodge Charger, or a Honda Civic, you’re likely budget-conscious. So, drive gently. There’s rarely a need to drop the clutch and peel your wheels at 6,000 rpms. Besides, constantly doing so will land your vehicle in the repair shop far sooner than otherwise.

Your car won’t last forever. But, if you address key maintenance items, regularly check the fluids, and treat it gently (at start-up and while driving), you’ll prolong its life. And avoiding expensive repairs is nearly as good as money in the bank.

b1163

Posted by on May 21, 2018 in Cars |

Here is a Nissan Sunny (B11)

image from: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Nissan_Sunny_(B11)_01.jpg

I mean it ant the fastest car in the world but it might be a fun fixer upper to zip around for a kids starter car.

what would you do to it? how would you fix it up? add-ons and cool features you would do if it was yours or your kids?

leave your comments below please.

have you ever owned this same car?

a19794

Posted by on May 21, 2018 in Cars, Race Cars |

What about a 1979 for a race car… a BMW!

Check out this sweet ride:

Image from: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:BMW_M1_(1979)_p2.JPG

 

do you like the color of this car?

My daughter says this car is unique and economical and the tires don’t have enough silver, that’s the bad part about it. She does not like the BMW emblem.

She says the tires are to much black, she would like it if they were fuchsia pink. 🙂

This car she would love to decorate with stickers on the outside but just not the windows and she would love this car to sparkle.

She would also want this car to have the shape the taller so that when she gets in the car into her car seat she wouldn’t hit her head on the top every time.

She would like the review side mirrors to be the color of green.

She says the color of this car is not in unique and she would like this car to be the color of violet.

by the way she is 5 years old in a few weeks. lol

a19732

Posted by on May 21, 2018 in Race Cars |

Check out this 1973 Charger

Image from: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:1973_Charger_side.jpg

pretty sweet! 🙂

would love to race this car…

and find one and restore it to new again.

whats your favorite 1973 car?