Pages Menu
Categories Menu

Most recent articles

Does Your Street Race Car Have Tinted Windows?

Posted by on Mar 22, 2018 in Cars, Race, Tinted Windows |

Hey there,

Happy you stopped by this post… I wanted to write a post about your street Race Car having Tinted Windows or not and if not, why?

As Race Car lovers, we put so much money into our rides, from rims, tires, paint, graphics, and all sorts of engine enhancements plus all kinds of interior upgrades and add-ons…

One of the most valuable things you can invest in your race car is window tinting. There are many benefits, most commonly is changing the looks with Tinted Windows. But you also get UV protection from the sun’s harmful rays. You can also protect the interior from cracking and fading from the sun damage… most high quality films protect from skin cancer and is backed my the Skin Cancer Foundation.

With Tinted Windows you can go with dark tints for more of a privacy look also known sometimes as a ghetto look but can also serve a purpose if you need privacy to hide tools or something like that in the back of a truck or van… As you know we are more taking about race cars here and not trucks or van, so some of us do like there windows blacked out pretty dark getting the Gangster look.

You can also go with a really light shade if you want to be seen easier in your ride, this is more for the benefits of UV Protection and or Heat Rejection from some of the higher end films out there.

You can also go with something in-between, the medium shades keep your race car looking more classy looking, more of my personal favorites. People can obviously tell your windows are tinted but its not supper dark either.

All Tints are not created equal… there are many different brands of automotive window film out there and within each brand there are multiple different lines of films. Each have there different qualities and benefits that should be considered before getting your windows tinted.  So do your research before investing in window tinting for your ride… Trust me it’s not worth it to go cheap in the short run just to save money because it will cost you double or triple in the long run if you go with cheap tint. I have seen it first hand.

Enjoy this video I found on YouTube

and feel free to leave a comment and tell me what you think…

Do you have your car tinted?

How light or dark did you go?

What brand of film did you go with?

What line within that brand did you get?

leave a pic of your car if you can.

 

Thanks and all the best,

Check you on the next post.

b1163

Posted by on May 21, 2018 in Cars |

Here is a Nissan Sunny (B11)

image from: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Nissan_Sunny_(B11)_01.jpg

I mean it ant the fastest car in the world but it might be a fun fixer upper to zip around for a kids starter car.

what would you do to it? how would you fix it up? add-ons and cool features you would do if it was yours or your kids?

leave your comments below please.

have you ever owned this same car?

a19794

Posted by on May 21, 2018 in Cars, Race Cars |

What about a 1979 for a race car… a BMW!

Check out this sweet ride:

Image from: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:BMW_M1_(1979)_p2.JPG

 

do you like the color of this car?

My daughter says this car is unique and economical and the tires don’t have enough silver, that’s the bad part about it. She does not like the BMW emblem.

She says the tires are to much black, she would like it if they were fuchsia pink. 🙂

This car she would love to decorate with stickers on the outside but just not the windows and she would love this car to sparkle.

She would also want this car to have the shape the taller so that when she gets in the car into her car seat she wouldn’t hit her head on the top every time.

She would like the review side mirrors to be the color of green.

She says the color of this car is not in unique and she would like this car to be the color of violet.

by the way she is 5 years old in a few weeks. lol

a19732

Posted by on May 21, 2018 in Race Cars |

Check out this 1973 Charger

Image from: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:1973_Charger_side.jpg

pretty sweet! 🙂

would love to race this car…

and find one and restore it to new again.

whats your favorite 1973 car?

 

 

What To Do When You’re Involved In A Fender Bender

Posted by on May 20, 2018 in Car Tips |

What To Do When You’re Involved In A Fender Bender

Being involved in a traffic collision can be extremely unnerving. It may be difficult to think clearly as you try to collect your thoughts and check whether you’re injured. It’s important that you know what steps to take in order to make sure the event is documented properly and you can follow up with the other driver. If you have never been involved in a fender bender, use the following tips as a blueprint to guide you through the experience.

Keep Your Thoughts To Yourself

A lot of motorists are tempted to absorb responsibility for the car accident, even if fault lies with the other driver. It’s fine to ask the other person if they’re injured, but avoid discussing the accident until the police arrive. That will give you time to clear your thoughts so you can provide an accurate account.

Take Pictures And Notes

Photograph both vehicles. Ideally, the photos should clearly show any damaged parts on your car and the positions of the vehicles in relation to the road. That will provide context. When you contact your insurance company, the photographs will help validate your claims.

Also, write down any notes that seem relevant; you may be unable to recall certain details later. If anybody who is not involved with the accident witnessed it, collect their contact information.

File A Traffic Accident Report

It’s helpful to complete a police report, even if you and the other driver are uninjured. Not only does the report document the event, but it can often help accelerate the response from your insurance company.

Get The Other Driver’s Information

Getting the contact information of the other motorist is essential if you intend to follow up later. Ask for the person’s name, phone number, address, and insurance policy number. You’ll also want to have their driver’s license number. Finally, if the other person doesn’t own the car, ask how they are related to the owner and ask for the owner’s contact information.

Review Your Auto Insurance Policy

You should have a basic understanding about what your auto insurance policy covers before you’re involved in a collision. Take the time to review your policy. Does it cover a rental car and tow truck? Does it cover your car in the event the other driver is uninsured? At the very least, know where your policy is so you can quickly contact your insurance company to start the claims process.

One last note about getting into fender benders: if the damage is minor, it’s tempting to settle the matter privately rather than contacting your auto insurance provider. That can leave you vulnerable. The other motorist might change his mind and contact his provider, making up details that are inaccurate. If your carrier is unable to determine what truly happened, you may become exposed to a lawsuit. Play it safe and report the incident to your auto insurance provider. The extra time you spend is a good investment for peace of mind.

Bolster The Performance Of Your Vehicle’s Power Steering

Posted by on May 10, 2018 in Car Tips |

Bolster The Performance Of Your Vehicle’s Power Steering

It’s easy to take power steering (PS) for granted. We have become accustomed to being able to control our vehicles with our index finger, forgetting the thousands of pounds of metal that we’re navigating through our steering wheel. If you’d like a reminder regarding how difficult it would be to steer without power, let your vehicle coast down your driveway with the engine off. You’ll likely struggle to turn the wheel.

Below, we’ll briefly explore the two types of power steering systems: rack and pinion and recirculating ball. We’ll use that introduction as the framework on which to get more performance from your PS system.

Two Types Of PS Systems

All types of PS work with hydraulics. Your car’s engine drives a belt which powers a hydraulic pump. The pump places hydraulic pressure on a small bit of fluid, which ultimately allows you to steer without effort.

Rack and pinion systems are the most common type of steering found in today’s cars. It uses a gearset that is attached to the steering shaft. A pinion gear is attached to the shaft and moves a rack as you turn the wheel. A tie rod sits on the end of the rack and connects to a steering arm, which controls the movement of the tires.

A recirculating ball system is commonly found in large pickups and SUVs. It uses ball bearings within threads that are located between the steering shaft and rack. As the rack moves up and down, the hydraulic pressure allows you to turn right and left, respectively.

Tips For Getting More Performance

Power steering systems feel differently on various types of cars. For example, giant domestic vehicles have a softer feel to the wheel. It’s almost “spongy.” Meanwhile, some of the German vehicles (e.g. BMWs) are more responsive to your commands.

There are plenty of steps you can take in order to get the most from your PS system. First, make sure your treads are healthy by periodically rotating your tires. You should also check the tire pressure every two or three weeks.

Second, if you make a turn and realize that you’re going too fast, avoid applying your brakes. Using your brakes can cause you to lose control of your vehicle. Instead, simply take your foot off the gas pedal and allow the friction of your tires and the momentum of your car to reduce your speed.

Third, remember that your PS system relies on your engine to drive the belt which powers the hydraulic pump. Be prepared to exert force in the event that your engine stalls while you’re driving.

Your vehicle’s power steering system is unlikely to fail; they’re built to last for many years. That said, if you notice a sluggish response in the wheel, wandering back and forth, or a high-pitched squeal when turning the wheel, take your car to a mechanic. Your PS system may need repairs.

Good Spotters are Key to Success on Track

Posted by on Apr 20, 2018 in NASCAR at the Track, Racing Observations |

Behind every superstar driver in the sport today is a good crew chief, good team, good equipment, and supportive sponsors.  But one vital piece of the puzzle that doesn’t get the praise they deserve is the team’s spotter.  If you ever listen to a scanner during the race, the voice you will hear 80% of the time will be that of the spotter.  They are entrusted with being the “eyes in the sky” for their driver.

In today’s NASCAR with all the safety innovations being implemented, the driver’s visibility has been hindered by seat design, helmets, HANS devices, roll cages, and window nets.  The drivers must rely heavily on their spotters in order to maneuver safely during a race.  The spotters are constantly updating the drivers on where other cars are and must warn them of accidents on the track.  At tracks like Daytona and Talladega where the racing is so tight and the wrecks so big, spotters are on the radio talking for almost the entire race giving their drivers information.

The amount of trust a driver must have in his spotter is immense.  One wrong call by a spotter can result in ruined races, but also wrecked race cars and injured drivers.  Many driver/spotter combinations are long lasting partnerships.  Cup driver Ryan Newman has a particularly close relationship with his spotter, who also happens to be his father.  And you won’t usually find spotters jumping from team to team like many other crew members.

Spotters do much more then just say “clear” on the radio.  Besides the actual spotting they do, they must also be a coach during the race.  They can either calm or fire up a driver, let him know about the lines other cars are using, and help coach their technique.  Many former drivers serve as spotters such as Jimmy Kitchens, Curtis Markham, David Green, Mark Green, Jason Jarrett, and Tim Fedewa.  Their racing experience proves valuable to many drivers.

Spotters also have to keep track of what other cars do on pit road.  Crew chiefs can’t see up and down pit road, so the spotter is often called upon to relay information about the strategies of other teams.

It is also important for spotters to know what’s going on inside the racecar.  They must keep track of what switches the driver has on and off for things like brake fans, and they must know pit road rules and pit road speeds.

During the race the spotter must not only listen and talk on his own team’s radio, but must also listen to the NASCAR Race Control frequency to keep abreast of calls NASCAR is making in regards to running order, cautions, debris, and any other instructions from the race director.

Today’s spotters have a lot of responsibilities to juggle.  It becomes a “pat your head, rub your stomach, and chew gum all while you walk” exercise.  And it is definitely not something anybody can do.  In my time in racing I’ve seen both people that could get it done, and those who couldn’t.  A spotter who doesn’t pay attention all the time or doesn’t know what is going on can be a dangerous thing.  It takes complete focus for an entire race to be successful.

I will forever be grateful to a specific spotter who is in the Cup Series.  During a race at Texas, a car spun out of turn four and was headed for pit road.  This spotter had the sense to not only let his driver know there was a wreck, but also warn our team as it was happening to get away from the pit wall.  The car ended up hitting the pit wall just two stalls down from ours and came to rest right in front us.  That is how to get it done as a spotter.

2 Comments on “Good Spotters are Key to Success on Track”

  1. #1 RonRipple.com
    on May 27th, 2008 at 11:07 am

    I enjoyed your article and will agree that they get NO credit if any…

    Keep up the good work and fix your left hand categories column!

    Ron Ripple
    Nascar’s biggest fan

  2. #2 Steph
    on Apr 17th, 2009 at 12:21 pm

    I am a bit late responding to this post, but you mention that spotters don’t jump from team to team (usually) and I do know of one spotter who has worked for 3 different teams in one (possibly 2) season.
    Would that be because they have problems getting along with the driver, getting the job done or both? I read your “blacklisted” article and would think if that is the case that the other 2 teams wouldn’t have picked this spotter up, but I am even more confused to find that a “veteran” cup driver is now using him.